Interlude

            At this time, I feel that it would be helpful to explain some of the background behind the Grak language. First of all, yes, it is called “Grak”. The Grak speak Grak. Second, Grak doesn’t contain the same type of sounds that the English language does. The letter “l” is seldom used, except occasionally at the ends of words (such as “Drhakul”). Also, the Grak have no lips (which won’t be revealed until a later episode), so they also do not use such sounds as made by letters such as “m”, “b”, “w”, “p” and sometimes “v”. These letters may be used in future linguistic representations (for example “f”), as they are sometimes the best way to represent a sound. But since written Grak consists of more than six thousand phonetic characters, our letters will never be able to accurately depict what they are really saying. I’ve used the freak letters (“x” and the “rh” conglomerate) to depict sounds that aren’t normally used in the English language. For future reference, “x” is for a guttural “ch”, much like that in “Chanukah” if you pronounce it correctly. The most accurate description of it is that it sounds like someone coughing up phlegm (which is, in and of itself, another very interestingly spelled and sounding word). Thank you.